B12 Solipsism

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IFTTT Recipe Acting Strangely

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Chainsaw sculpture
chainsaw-sculpture – source unknown

If you’ve noticed, in the last couple of days photos have appeared here that have already been posted; duplicate entries from weeks ago. I don’t know why this is happening, but I do know the cause – https://ifttt.com/wtf

I have a recipe that works like this: if I add the keyword “blogged” to a Flickr photo, the photo gets published on this blog with the author being “eggplant”.  I find this recipe to be a fairly easy way to add photos – all it takes is adding a tag, which can be accomplished even with a mobile devie – the main complaint I’ve had is that the photo has to be fairly recent. It doesn’t work with any image uploaded more than six months ago, give or take.

IFTTT Recipe: New Flickr photo with tag “blogged” gets a WP post connects flickr to wordpress

I’ve used this recipe 183 times as of this morning, but starting yesterday, duplicates started appearing. I’ve deleted them all so far, but since this is an automated process, I don’t notice the duplications until later, which means they get pushed out to my Tumblr blog, Twitter, yadda yadda. Irritating, but not happening frequently enough to turn off the recipe. Yet.

Apologies.

Written by Seth Anderson

June 14th, 2014 at 8:51 am

Posted in blog

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Delicious Twitter Feedburner IFTTT problems again

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Defunct Tweets
Defunct Tweets

For a long time, I had worked out a good system, using Delicious, Twitter, Feedburner and IFTTT. I found interesting articles or phrases in my daily internet life, tweeted them, and these URLs would be automatically fed into my Delicious account, and this in turn would seed entries into my daily blog email post. Thus my blog’s hunger stayed fed, and I didn’t have to go to the trouble of creating an entire post around a few sentences. However, Twitter, in its drive to become less useful, has disallowed this kind of interaction by changing its APIs. Twitter wants to force every user interaction to occur on its own webpage, presumedly so they can sell advertising “eyeballs” – viewers – but this means a lot of the cool stuff that Twitter could be used for no longer are viable. At least that is my understanding of what happened between yesterday and today.

I’ll see what I can do to replace this lack of grist for my web grinding mill, but it is irritating. Anyone have any suggestions? Email me, or leave a comment.

Here is what should have been included in this morning’s blog email:

  • “Mother Cabrini Shrine Reopening; Le Corbusier in Color; More!” http://t.co/w9ainEtn
  • “Ross Douthat’s schtick at The Atlantic: repeating Redstate talking points, minus the obscenity and grammatical errors” http://t.co/rkJVN0eH
  • “Todd Akin compared the recent debate performance of Democratic Sen. Claire McCaskill to that of a “wildcat,” http://t.co/JOmjmi29
  • “In 1960, about 5% of Americans expressed a negative reaction to political intermarriage; in 2010, about 40% did ” http://t.co/ONkWfpDk
  • “Pro-life asshole vows to fight “to his dying breath” for rights of unborn” http://t.co/bMJ6qFwc C’mon Canada, you are better than this
  • Opium Museum http://t.co/vTfSaJm4 
  • “How Collecting Opium Antiques Turned Me Into an Opium Addict” http://t.co/KWV4aoey
  • “Romney mentioned that it would routinely take up to eight years to turn around a firm” http://t.co/xdbBghjv but US govt easier?
  • Why Ryan is worse for Romney than “47 percent” http://t.co/79gHpcPE
  • Brad DeLong: I Do Not Understand Why This Is Not Tax Fraud… http://t.co/wLipfAfZ Good ole DoubleClick
  • Your Body’s Best Time for Everything http://t.co/N7KUjLQj

And actually, I’m being a little lazy in my cut/paste job here, as these links would also have included the full, original title of the URL, which is sometimes descriptive as well. For instance, the second link about Ross Douthat would have also spelled out “And If Only The Vietnamese Had Worn Bright Red Coats And Formed Infantry Squares”. You get the idea.

Anyway, thanks for messing up my workflow Twitter…

Written by Seth Anderson

September 28th, 2012 at 9:02 am

Posted in Advertising,blog

Tagged with ,

Case of Dead Sea Scrolls, Online Aliases Ends With Probation

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Adjusted In Time
Adjusted In Time…

I am pretty sure we’ve been paying attention to this case since it was first reported, ten years ago or more, but am too lazy to look in former iterations of this blog to find the reference.

The gears of justice do grind exceedingly slow, don’t they?

The NYT reports:

Raphael Golb’s conviction wasn’t quite like any other: using online aliases to discredit his father’s adversary in a scholarly debate over the Dead Sea Scrolls.

The 9-year-old case got a New York law thrown out and finally ended Monday with no jail time for Golb, who persuaded a judge to revisit a two-month jail sentence imposed earlier in the case.

Appeals had put the jail term on hold and narrowed the counts in his criminal impersonation and forgery conviction in a curious case of ancient religious texts, digital misdeeds, academic rivalries and filial loyalty.

“Obviously, I’m relieved not to be going to jail,” Golb said, adding that he remains concerned by having been prosecuted for online activity he said was meant as satire. “The judge today did the right thing, but the whole thing should have been thrown out nine years ago.”

(click here to continue reading Case of Dead Sea Scrolls, Online Aliases Ends With Probation – The New York Times.)

Written by Seth Anderson

April 16th, 2018 at 11:12 am

Posted in crime

Tagged with

Facebook hackers could have collected personal data of 2 billion users

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No Need To Look The Other Way
No Need To Look The Other Way. 

From the Washington Post we learn that basically every piece of data Facebook collected about you has been shared with the digital marketing world, and the dark web whether you agreed to do that or not:

Facebook said Wednesday that “malicious actors” took advantage of search tools on its platform, making it possible for them to discover the identities and collect information on most of its 2 billion users worldwide.

…But the abuse of Facebook’s search tools — now disabled — happened far more broadly and over the course of several years, with few Facebook users likely escaping the scam, company officials acknowledged.

The scam started when hackers harvested email addresses and phone numbers on the “dark Web,” where criminals post information stolen in data breaches over the years. Then the hackers used automated computer programs to feed the numbers and addresses into Facebook’s “search” box, allowing them to discover the full names of people affiliated with the phone numbers or addresses, along with whatever Facebook profile information they chose to make public, often including their profile photos and hometowns.

Names, phone numbers, email addresses and other personal information amount to critical starter kits for identity theft and other malicious online activity, experts on Internet crime say. The Facebook hacks allowed bad actors to tie raw data to people’s real identities and build fuller profiles of them.

Developers who in the past could get access to people’s relationship status, calendar events, private Facebook posts and much more data will now be cut off from access or be required to endure a much stricter process for obtaining the information, Facebook said.

Until Wednesday, apps that let people input Facebook events into their calendars could also automatically import lists of all the people who attended the events, Facebook said. Administrators of private groups, some of which have tens of thousands of members, could also let apps scrape the Facebook posts and profiles of members of those groups. App developers who want this access will now have to prove that their activities benefit the group. Facebook will now need to approve tools that businesses use to operate Facebook pages. A business that uses an app to help it respond quickly to customer messages, for example, will not be able to do so automatically. Developers’ access to Instagram will also be severely restricted.

Facebook is banning apps from accessing users’ information about their religious or political views, relationship status, education, work history, fitness activity, book reading habits, music listening and news reading activity, video watching and games. Data brokers and businesses collect this type of information to build profiles of their customers’ tastes.

(click here to continue reading Facebook hackers could have collected personal data of 2 billion users .)

Heck of a network you’ve created, Zuckerberg. 

There is no way to put this information back into the bottle, the only thing left to do is protecting future information from being harvested, and perhaps punishing Facebook for its lackadaisical approach to protecting the world’s personal data. Shut them down!

Speaking for myself, I don’t feel too worried, I always was a bit leery with giving Facebook access to my actual information. They do have my birthday, and where I went to school, but nearly everything else I put in my profile was faux information, or things available elsewhere. For a long time, I’ve used the Facebook API and other tools to automatically post photos from Flickr, Instagram, blog entries, etc. But who knows, perhaps I wasn’t careful enough to always delete my Facebook cookies, and so they scraped more information about me than I know. I did use the Facebook app for a few months before deleting it off of my iOS devices, but all it takes is a moment of unguarded attention, and the freaks at Facebook will vacuum up everything not nailed down. So the dark web may know more about me than I know. 

In Your Bubble Where Nothing Goes Wrong
In Your Bubble Where Nothing Goes Wrong

Barbara Ortutay adds:

 

On Monday all Facebook users will receive a notice on their Facebook feeds with a link to see what apps they use and what information they have shared with those apps. They’ll have a chance to delete apps they no longer want. Users who might have had their data shared with Cambridge Analytica will be told of that. Facebook says most of the affected users are in the U.S.

As part of the steps it’s taking to address scrutiny about outsiders’ access to user data, Facebook outlined several changes to further tighten its policies. For one, it is restricting access that apps can have to data about users’ events, as well as information about groups such as member lists and content.

In addition, the company is also removing the option to search for users by entering a phone number or an email address. While this helped individuals find friends, Facebook says businesses that had phone or email information on customers were able to collect profile information this way. Facebook says it believes most of its 2.2 billion users had their public profile information scraped by businesses or various malicious actors through this technique at some point. Posts and other content set to be visible only to friends weren’t collected.

This comes on top of changes announced a few weeks ago. For example, Facebook has said it will remove developers’ access to people’s data if the person has not used the app in three months.

 

 

(click here to continue reading Facebook scandal affected more users than thought: up to 87M – Chicago Tribune.)

Sure, sure. I bet that will solve everything.

Written by Seth Anderson

April 5th, 2018 at 11:24 am

Posted in Advertising,Business

Tagged with ,

Hurricane Harvey’s Toxic Impact Deeper Than Public Told

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No Chemicals
No Chemicals…

Surprising nobody, the EPA and Texas governor are sweeping any discussion of toxicity under the concrete. 

A toxic onslaught from the nation’s petrochemical hub was largely overshadowed by the record-shattering deluge of Hurricane Harvey as residents and first responders struggled to save lives and property.

More than a half-year after floodwaters swamped America’s fourth-largest city, the extent of this environmental assault is beginning to surface, while questions about the long-term consequences for human health remain unanswered.

County, state and federal records pieced together by The Associated Press and The Houston Chronicle reveal a far more widespread toxic impact than authorities publicly reported after the storm slammed into the Texas coast in late August and then stalled over the Houston area.

Some 500 chemical plants, 10 refineries and more than 6,670 miles of intertwined oil, gas and chemical pipelines line the nation’s largest energy corridor.

Nearly half a billion gallons of industrial wastewater mixed with storm water surged out of just one chemical plant in Baytown, east of Houston on the upper shores of Galveston Bay.

Benzene, vinyl chloride, butadiene and other known human carcinogens were among the dozens of tons of industrial toxins released into surrounding neighborhoods and waterways following Harvey’s torrential rains.

In all, reporters catalogued more than 100 Harvey-related toxic releases — on land, in water and in the air. Most were never publicized, and in the case of two of the biggest ones, the extent or potential toxicity of the releases was initially understated.

Only a handful of the industrial spills have been investigated by federal regulators, reporters found.

(click here to continue reading Hurricane Harvey’s Toxic Impact Deeper Than Public Told – The New York Times.)

Disturbing, and portent of massive human misery to come, especially if the GOP controls the environmental inspectors. Profits over people, always, is the Republican agenda.

Written by Seth Anderson

March 22nd, 2018 at 9:54 am

Posted in environment,government

Tagged with , ,

The New York Times has shut down its customizable keyword email alerts feature

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Daily News
Daily News.

This bummed me out enough that I wrote a complaint (unanswered) to the NYT. I’ve had about 30 of these email alerts, configured over the years for specific topics-of-interest, and I found them extremely useful. There is so much information published every hour, one cannot keep up with constant stream of topics without technological assistance. Even if I only read the New York Times, and I don’t, I doubt I could keep up. Having a customizable keyword search was very useful. Oh well, consumers of news are less and less important to corporate media entities. Google News alerts are ok, but they aren’t as targeted, nor useful.

The New York Times has sunset those custom email alerts to Times stories, that users could tailor based on keywords of their interests. The feature, which met its unceremonious end Tuesday, March 13, was being used by less than half a percent of users, according to a Times spokesperson. From the outside, it didn’t seem like MyAlerts was a huge technical lift to maintain, but “much of the technology powering MyAlerts was built in the early 2000s.”

Ending the feature frees up “resources to invest in new engagement and messaging features that will debut in 2018. We also encourage our readers to sign up for one of over 50 email newsletters.”

(click here to continue reading The New York Times has shut down its customizable keyword email alerts feature ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ » Nieman Journalism Lab.)

The webservice company IFTTT has an applet that purports to emulate this functionality, but as far as I can tell, you can only have one keyword alert at a time which is pretty lame.

Written by Seth Anderson

March 15th, 2018 at 11:48 pm

Posted in News-esque

Tagged with ,

Moorish Science Temple of America inc was uploaded to Flickr

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Temple Nine, 1000 N Hoyne, Ukrainian Village, Chicago.

Read more about them:
http://ift.tt/1EBxB6G

embiggen the photo by clicking here
http://flic.kr/p/LnY9pX

I took Moorish Science Temple of America inc on June 16, 2013 at 01:55PM

and processed it in my digital darkroom on August 24, 2016 at 01:42PM

((Sometimes, not all times, but more than half of the time, these automatic IFTTT posts are created twice. Too lazy to troubleshoot, so this is an apology for all the future times it will happen))

Written by eggplant

August 24th, 2016 at 12:47 pm

Photo Republished at Did Pharmaceutical Firms Exploit Pancreas Problems to Increase Profits? – Truthdig

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My photo was used to illustrate this post

Photo by swanksalot (CC BY-SA 2.0) Successful efforts by patient advocacy groups to require new approval standards for a particular class of drugs have resulted, perhaps inadvertently, in a sharp reduction of available products and a spike in the cost of brand name drugs to a tune of $350 million per year, Gastroenterology & Endoscopy News contributor Monica J. Smith reports.

click here to keep reading :
Did Pharmaceutical Firms Exploit Pancreas Problems to Increase Profits? – Truthdig

automatically created via Delicious and IFTTT

Written by eggplant

July 28th, 2014 at 6:51 pm

Photo Republished at Drones: Everything You Ever Wanted to Know But Were Always Afraid to Ask | Mother Jones

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Foreign Policy 

My photo was used to illustrate this post

swanksalot/Flickr Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch released two separate new reports on civilian deaths in US drone strikes. Amnesty’s report examines 45 strikes in North Waziristan in northwestern Pakistan between January 2012 and August 2013, and HRW’s examines six examples of targeted killing in Yemen. “The drones are like the angels of death,” says Nazeer Gul, a shopkeeper in the Pakistani town of Miramshah. If you’ve checked out the news these past few (or many) months, you’ve probably noticed some news about drones. Drones used by the CIA to vaporize suspected terrorists. Drones used by the United States military. Drones that deliver food. Drones used by cops. Drones possibly violating the US Constitution. Drones protecting wildlife. Drones in pop culture. Maybe this has left you with some burning questions about these increasingly prominent flying robots. Here’s an easy-to-read, nonwonky guide to them—we’ll call it Drones for Dummies.

click here to keep reading :
Drones: Everything You Ever Wanted to Know But Were Always Afraid to Ask | Mother Jones

automatically created via Delicious and IFTTT

Written by eggplant

July 28th, 2014 at 6:51 pm

Posted in Links

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Photo Republished at The Biggest Box Office Bombs of the Modern Era | American News

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My photo was used to illustrate this post

The Biggest Box Office Bombs of the Modern Era. #6, John Carter. Photo Credit – Flickr User – Seth Anderson.

click here to keep reading :
The Biggest Box Office Bombs of the Modern Era | American News

automatically created via Delicious and IFTTT

Written by eggplant

July 22nd, 2014 at 3:33 pm

Posted in Links

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Photo Republished at All that Big Data Is Not Going to Manage Itself: Part One | The Signal: Digital Preservation

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Data Dump 

My photo was used to illustrate this post

Since 2003 we’ve seen the National Science Foundation release its requirements for Data Management Plans (DMPs) and the White House address records management, open government data and “big data.”  There are now data management and sharing requirements from NASA, the Department of Energy… In this two-part series on government data management we’ll take a look back at some of the guidance that is driving data management practices across the federal government. In the second part we’ll look at the tools and services that have developed to meet the needs of this expanding data management infrastructure. It’s 2014 and we’re still struggling to ensure that the outputs of government-funded research are secure and made accessible as building blocks for new knowledge, but it’s not for lack of trying: federal government agencies such as NIH and the NSF recognized the need to preserve and keep data accessible through the requirements tied to their grant funding.

click here to keep reading :
All that Big Data Is Not Going to Manage Itself: Part One | The Signal: Digital Preservation

automatically created via Delicious and IFTTT

Written by eggplant

May 29th, 2014 at 10:52 am

Posted in Links

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Photo Republished at CraigsLostChicago

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Boston Store

My photo was used to illustrate this post

My photo of Boston Store used here, sans credit. I don’t care, much, because there are a lot of fun photos here. Though, it is unfortunate that this dude didn’t give credit to most of the photographers who took the photos.

click here to keep reading :
CraigsLostChicago

automatically created via Delicious and IFTTT

Written by eggplant

April 24th, 2014 at 8:27 am

Photo Republished at Man Charged in Connection with Loop Bank Robbery

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Federal Bureau of Investigation Chicago Division

My photo was used to illustrate this post

CHICAGO — A man who was arrested by police shortly after the robbery of a Loop bank Tuesday afternoon has been charged in connection with the incident. Jamal Genson, 28, appeared in federal court Wednesday and was charged with a count of felony bank robbery. A Fifth Third Bank was robbed about 3 p.m. Tuesday after a man demanded money from a teller using a note before running off, according to FBI Special Agent Joan Hyde, an agency spokeswoman.

click here to keep reading :
Man Charged in Connection with Loop Bank Robbery – The Loop

automatically created via Delicious and IFTTT

Written by eggplant

April 17th, 2014 at 9:52 am

Posted in Links

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Photo Republished at Gangsters & Speakeasies: Buildings of Historic Chicago

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Green Mill Daguerreotype
My photo was used to illustrate this post

Green Mill Jazz Club The speakeasy, 1920′s icon. When prohibition began, outlawing the sale of alcohol in the United States paved the way for criminals like Al Capone to come to fruition. And if you think prohibition stopped alcohol, well, then… the word naive comes to mind. Alcohol, if anything, was more rampant in the 1920′s. Want to make something that’s already fun even more popular?? Make it taboo. The “speakeasy” was the slang term for an establishment that illegally sold alcohol during these times. Some were seedy bars, others were extravagant nightclubs filled with the rich and famous. The Green Mill Jazz Club, still open today, was a popular speakeasy back during prohibition and at one point even owned by Jack McGurn, a right hand man of Al Capone.? photo credit:?swanksalot

click here to keep reading :
Gangsters & Speakeasies: Buildings of Historic Chicago

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Written by eggplant

April 8th, 2014 at 11:35 am

Emptiness

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vs.

Emptiness

because…

When building out products and features we do primarily two things: We listen to our community and we use data to make decisions. Today, we are announcing that there will be two changes to Flickr.

First, we are going to re-introduce the HTML embed option to the new photo experience. It will be live on Tue 3/18. This now gives you two great options to integrate Flickr content into your web experiences: with the Flickr Web Embeds and the popular HTML embed code that you asked for.

Secondly, we are announcing that we are deprecating the support for our built-in sharing options for WordPress, Blogger and LiveJournal on 3/25. Deprecating features is never an easy decision, but we have seen that all of these services combined are now adding up to less than one percent of daily share volume from Flickr.

(click here to continue reading Flickr: The Help Forum: [Official Thread] Welcome back HTML Embeds! Goodbye to some sharing options..)

I am saddened by this deprecation. The great website IFTTT does interact with Flickr to post to WordPress, I wonder will this upcoming change break my recipe for posting? Even my current Post To WordPress From Flickr recipe only works for photos uploaded recently, if I wish to post older images like the above parking lot scene, I have to use Flickr tools.

Flickr HTML embed

Flickr iFrame embed

Flickr HTML embed

Flickr HTML embed

Flickr Sharing Options

Flickr sharing options as of March 16th, 2014

Written by Seth Anderson

March 16th, 2014 at 12:16 pm

Posted in Photography

Tagged with , ,

:)