B12 Solipsism

Spreading confusion over the internet since 1994

Archive for the ‘Photography’ Category

Photos on your screen are nice, but photos on your wall are better!
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Kodak Professional Film App is A Useful Pocket Guide

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Kodak Cameras and Film
Kodak Cameras and Film

I downloaded the Kodak Professional Film app this afternoon, and for a free app, it has some useful bits: a sunrise/sunset geolocation time calculator, a local processing guide, etc. Worth the price, certainly1

Kodak Professional Film App is a Killer Pocket Guide for Kodak Film Lovers:

The Kodak Professional Film App isn’t new, but it just got a big update that makes it more widely compatible and more useful than it was before.

Using the new and improved app, Kodak film shooters can: get recommendations on what film type would work best for a particular situation, learn about different film formats, search for retail locations that sell Kodak film within 200 miles of you, search for places that will develop the specific Kodak film you’re shooting, find out when the sun is rising and setting at your current location, and, as if that wasn’t enough, there’s even an at-home B&W darkroom processing guide.

(Via PetaPixel)

Footnotes:
  1. free []

Written by Seth Anderson

May 27th, 2016 at 6:33 pm

Posted in Business,Photography

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Hecate Lingers Low On the Horizon was uploaded to Flickr

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West Loop

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http://flic.kr/p/H9SkM9

I took Hecate Lingers Low On the Horizon on May 19, 2016 at 01:17PM

and processed it in my digital darkroom on May 27, 2016 at 09:47AM

Written by eggplant

May 27th, 2016 at 12:18 pm

Too Many People, Too Many To Recall was uploaded to Flickr

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333 W Wacker

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http://flic.kr/p/HsWt1x

I took Too Many People, Too Many To Recall on May 26, 2016 at 06:47AM

and processed it in my digital darkroom on May 27, 2016 at 08:58AM

Written by eggplant

May 27th, 2016 at 12:17 pm

Our Lady of Perpetual Decay was uploaded to Flickr

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Shrine, northside of Chicago somewhere (near Broadway, I think)

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http://flic.kr/p/H9MBFo

I took Our Lady of Perpetual Decay on June 08, 2013 at 12:57PM

and processed it in my digital darkroom on May 27, 2016 at 08:56AM

Written by eggplant

May 27th, 2016 at 12:17 pm

Photography As Art

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Analog Light Meter
Analog Light Meter

There is a trend towards so-called authenticity in many fields. Reuters and perhaps some other news organizations no longer accept photos shot as digital RAW files. If you want your photo published by Reuters, you have to use your camera only as a recording device:

Reuters, the news and photography agency, has issued an outright ban on photographs captured and submitted in RAW format. Instead, freelance contributors must now only submit photos that were processed and stored as JPEG inside the camera.

According to Reuters, there are two reasons for this move. First, there’s the matter of alacrity: RAW images need to be processed by the photographer, which takes time—and when you’re reporting on a breaking story, sometimes you don’t have time. The second reason is much more contentious: Reuters wants its photographs to closely reflect reality (i.e. be journalistic), and it’s concerned that some RAW photos are being processed to the point where they’re no longer real.

“As photojournalists working for the world’s largest international multimedia news provider, Reuters Pictures photographers work in line with our Photographer’s Handbook and the Thomson Reuters Trust Principles,” a Reuters spokesperson told PetaPixel. “As eyewitness accounts of events covered by dedicated and responsible journalists, Reuters Pictures must reflect reality. While we aim for photography of the highest aesthetic quality, our goal is not to artistically interpret the news.”

(click here to continue reading Reuters bans submission of RAW photos: “Our photos must reflect reality.” | Ars Technica.)

Many photographers on Flickr and elsewhere boast about how little processing they perform on their photos. Perhaps this is a natural reaction to the digital photography world, filled with HDR photos looking like SciFi films, or over-saturated to the point of eye bleeding, or Instragram images where a photo is often tweaked with a filter with but a few seconds consideration. It is true that new photographers often over-process their photographs, yet that doesn’t make processing a tool to shy away from, only that someone has not yet learned to process well. I remember when I first starting fooling around with Photoshop with scanned prints: it was so easy to make gaudy, weird and obviously digital manipulations, I was learning how to use the tools. None of those experiments are online, or few, but I consider it part of the process of learning.

There was this example too:

You’ve probably heard by now that Steve McCurry is the latest to be caught up in a manipulation scandal. PetaPixel has reported that several examples of excessive Photoshopping of McCurry photos have come to light. A Facebook user named Gianmarco Maraviglia found this example:

Steve McCurry processing example
Steve McCurry example

Study that for a couple of minutes and you can see how deep the changes go. Not as bad, arguably, as the example of the soccer-playing boys on PetaPixel where a whole person was removed. A photograph is in part a witness, and that’s part of what makes it unique: At that moment, that boy was there. He might not have been, but he was. The look of the world is inconvenient to our picture-contriving intent. But that’s part of what makes it so mysterious and rich.

By the late 1970s, the fundamental difference between photography and all the other methods of creating visual art had been worked out more or less completely. Photography was a matter of “hand and eye,” in the words of John Szarkowski, of recognition followed by the recording of the lens image more or less in an instant, and more or less as the lens saw it. Painting and other “plastic” (i.e., malleable) arts involved a back-and-forth over time: look, contemplate, evaluate, make changes; look, contemplate, evaluate, make more changes; and so on over and over, a process that could continue for days or weeks or even years.

(click here to continue reading The Online Photographer: The Ugliness of Beautification.)

Fruit Basket Still Life
Fruit Basket Still Life

Capturing the decisive moment is important, but much of what makes a photo a piece of art is more than just the mechanics. There is no one, perfect way to paint an apple or the curve of a woman’s hip, similarly, there is no ideal way to take and process a photograph. Art is expression, every artist has a different vision, whether or not they are new to the craft, or a seasoned professional, or somewhere in the middle, like myself.

Let The Words Roll Off Where They May
Let The Words Roll Off Where They May

Most black and white photos you see these days are actually shot in color, that’s a manipulation. Digital cameras capture red, green, blue, that is not the same as an analog film camera with different kinds of film stock.

Nearly 98% of the time, I crop a bit or a lot (I typically use a 5×7 ratio to crop, a 1.4 ratio, my camera is more like 16 x 11, a 1.5 ratio), 99% of the time, I enhance color contrast, and boost saturation. I don’t usually remove elements – other than by cropping – but I have occasionally removed a distracting car fender, or telephone wire. Composition is more often handled at time of photograph, but sometimes as a street photographer, you don’t lots of time to frame and mentally crop. Photoshop allows me to continue the work at a later time. I use filters to change the dominant color mood of a photo – turning water from brackish green to aquamarine for instance; or use a filter to emulate various film stock: Velvia, T-Max, Tri-X 400, or Ilford, sepia, cyanotype, etc.

I reject that photography has to be journalistic and nothing else. Speaking for myself, of course, I’m more interested in artistic expression, using the language of film, and the language of poetry to capture the myriad facets of the world around me, in all its ragged, incomplete glory. 

 

Written by Seth Anderson

May 27th, 2016 at 9:03 am

Posted in Arts,Photography

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How To: Take Pinhole Photos

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Pinhole Self Portrait Circa 1994
Pinhole Self Portrait Circa 1994 (scanned from a print)

I’ve been thinking of making a pinhole camera of my own. I have an older DSLR (Nikon D80) that I don’t use often. I am thinking of drilling a hole in the lens cap for a lens I also don’t use much, and then following the guidelines here.

A pinhole camera is as minimalist as photography gets: All you need 
is a light-tight box with a tiny hole on the front, and something 
light-sensitive fastened onto the inside rear of the box, and you can 
take a picture. In the process, you will get weirdly beautiful results, including infinite focus from near to far (or, often more accurately, equal slight fuzziness from near to far). “Once you realize that there are no knobs, no flashing lights, no buttons, dials, or digital displays to distract you, making pictures becomes fun again rather than a technical chore,” says Andrew Watson, who made this photo of the beach in Brighton, England on Kodak Ektar 100. You can make your own pinhole camera (out of practically anything), build a kit camera, buy a ready-made camera, or, simplest of all, use the camera you already have, whether film or digital, SLR or ILC, with a pinhole body cap in place of a lens.

You can turn a camera’s body cap into a pinhole with a little fuss. Drill a small (1/8-inch) hole in the center of the cap. For the pinhole itself, use soda-can aluminum. Cut an inch-square piece of the can with a snips, and pierce the center using the smallest needle that will go through. Then tape the pinhole over the hole you drilled in the body cap.

(click here to continue reading How To: Take Pinhole Photos | Popular Photography.)

I also have a 35mm camera that I don’t use, perhaps I should look into getting it running again (it does need some repair that I keep procrastinating over)

Written by Seth Anderson

May 20th, 2016 at 9:34 am

Posted in Photography

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Evening Full of Cold Facts and Warm Grins was uploaded to Flickr

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Rainy summer night

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http://flic.kr/p/GeNaVz

I took Evening Full of Cold Facts and Warm Grins on April 17, 2013 at 03:04PM

and processed it in my digital darkroom on May 14, 2016 at 03:54PM

Written by eggplant

May 14th, 2016 at 3:11 pm

Moccus – Porcine God of the West Loop was uploaded to Flickr

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Fulton Market

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http://flic.kr/p/Gq5Cpb

I took Moccus – Porcine God of the West Loop on September 29, 2011 at 11:33AM

and processed it in my digital darkroom on May 03, 2016 at 03:34PM

Written by eggplant

May 3rd, 2016 at 2:47 pm

Looking To The North was uploaded to Flickr

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Chicago, late afternoon. You can see a slice of the toilet bowl added to Soldier Field.

embiggen by clicking
http://flic.kr/p/GLuHfG

I took Looking To The North on September 10, 2011 at 12:49PM

and processed it in my digital darkroom on May 02, 2016 at 07:27PM

Written by eggplant

May 2nd, 2016 at 7:06 pm

The Music Kept Playing was uploaded to Flickr

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rooftop, West Loop somewhere (maybe the CTA HQ?)

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http://flic.kr/p/Gu4TBL

I took The Music Kept Playing on August 16, 2012 at 10:36AM

and processed it in my digital darkroom on April 26, 2016 at 04:53PM

Written by eggplant

April 26th, 2016 at 4:35 pm

Morgan Station at night was uploaded to Flickr

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West Loop

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http://flic.kr/p/GnjoVu

I took Morgan Station at night on June 03, 2012 at 04:15PM

and processed it in my digital darkroom on April 23, 2016 at 12:13AM

Written by eggplant

April 22nd, 2016 at 11:32 pm

Imagine No Smoking No Trespassing was uploaded to Flickr

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Fulton Market, West Loop

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http://flic.kr/p/GhnQr7

I took Imagine No Smoking No Trespassing on August 10, 2014 at 05:15AM

and processed it in my digital darkroom on April 16, 2016 at 01:10PM

Written by eggplant

April 16th, 2016 at 12:30 pm

Lyrics – Temporary Like Achilles – Bob Dylan was uploaded to Flickr

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At the LBJ Presidential Library for some reason (maybe a traveling exhibition, I don’t recall).

The lyrics are slightly different on Blonde on Blonde, but close

http://bobdylan.com/songs/temporary-achilles/

Temporary Like Achilles
WRITTEN BY: BOB DYLAN
Standing on your window, honey
Yes, I’ve been here before
Feeling so harmless
I’m looking at your second door
How come you don’t send me no regards?
You know I want your lovin’
Honey, why are you so hard?

Kneeling ’neath your ceiling
Yes, I guess I’ll be here for a while
I’m tryin’ to read your portrait, but
I’m helpless, like a rich man’s child
How come you send someone out to have me barred?
You know I want your lovin’
Honey, why are you so hard?

Like a poor fool in his prime
Yes, I know you can hear me walk
But is your heart made out of stone, or is it lime
Or is it just solid rock?

Well, I rush into your hallway
Lean against your velvet door
I watch upon your scorpion
Who crawls across your circus floor
Just what do you think you have to guard?
You know I want your lovin’
Honey, but you’re so hard

Achilles is in your alleyway
He don’t want me here, he does brag
He’s pointing to the sky
And he’s hungry, like a man in drag
How come you get someone like him to be your guard?
You know I want your lovin’
Honey, but you’re so hard
Copyright © 1966 by Dwarf Music; renewed 1994 by Dwarf Music

embiggen by clicking
http://flic.kr/p/FNUb1j

I took Lyrics – Temporary Like Achilles – Bob Dylan on July 20, 2014 at 09:27AM

and processed it in my digital darkroom on April 12, 2016 at 11:50PM

Written by eggplant

April 12th, 2016 at 11:04 pm

El Ray – Giant Olmec Head was uploaded to Flickr

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Teresa Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies, University of Texas, Austin

In November 2008, LLILAS celebrated the arrival of a special work of art on campus. The Universidad Veracruzana, one of Mexico’s most prominent universities, presented the institute with a colossal Olmec head, a replica of the iconic sculpture known as San Lorenzo Monument 1, or El Rey.

The original, now housed in the Museo de Antropología in Xalapa, Veracruz, is considered a signature piece of pre-Columbian Olmec culture and a world-class art object that represents New World civilization as emblematically as the Pyramid of the Sun at Teotihuacán or the ruins of Machu Picchu. One of seventeen colossal heads still in existence, San Lorenzo Monument 1 was found by noted archaeologist Matthew Stirling in the 1940s. His discoveries, and those of other archaeologists in Mexico during this time, unearthed for the world the culture of the Olmec, an ancient civilization that flourished in southern Mexico 1500-400 BCE and significantly influenced later cultures such as the Maya and Aztec.

The replica that now sits at the entry to LLILAS and the Benson Latin American Collection is made of solid stone and weighs 36,000 pounds. It was sculpted by Ignacio Pérez Solano, a Xalapa-based artist, who has spent his career exploring the history of the Gulf Coast and Mesoamerica. Pérez Solano meticulously reproduced San Lorenzo Monument 1 inch by inch, recreating the powerful lines and imposing features of the original work.

Pérez Solano began creating replicas of Olmec heads under the initiative of Miguel Alemán Velasco, who as governor of Veracruz from 1998 to 2004 endeavored to make Olmec culture better known beyond the borders of Mexico. Reproductions of other colossal heads can be found at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C., and the Field Museum in Chicago, among other locations. Miguel Alemán Velasco was present for the dedication ceremony at LLILAS on November 19, 2008, which also featured remarks by UT President William Powers and his counterpart, Raul Arias Lovillo of the Universidad Veracruzana. Fidel Herrera Beltrán, current Governor of Veracruz, also spoke, as did Olmec scholars from the U.S. and Mexico.
more
http://ift.tt/1WmBbw1

embiggen by clicking
http://flic.kr/p/FfbPs2

I took El Ray – Giant Olmec Head on July 20, 2014 at 08:41AM

and processed it in my digital darkroom on April 10, 2016 at 10:25PM

Written by eggplant

April 10th, 2016 at 9:40 pm

In A Cold Sweat was uploaded to Flickr

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West Loop somewhere, I think

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http://flic.kr/p/FcZ25r

I took In A Cold Sweat on May 03, 2014 at 07:41AM

and processed it in my digital darkroom on April 09, 2016 at 08:03PM

Written by eggplant

April 9th, 2016 at 7:11 pm