Categories
Food and Drink

Pump driven espresso

The coffee Geek writes : There is a fifth type of machine often (mistakenly) called an espresso machine; these are the steam driven machines marketed by companies like Krups and Braun, usually found for under $100. … I should upgrade to a pump-driven espresso maker, which heats water in a sealed reservoir, then forces it through pre-ground espresso beans at a requisite 15 atmospheres of pressure. I’m still on the look-out for my next machine. I don’t really want to spend over $300 dollars, and I have a fairly limited counter space to keep the thing, so I may settle for an also-ran machine that fulfills these parameters.

Any suggestions?

I’m on the hunt for the smallest pump-driven (or semi-pump driven) espresso machine. I don’t really have an obsession with crema, but am nearly ready to splurge on a proper coffee making device.

Breakfast Beverage
[This is a fine machine, capable of making a good, strong coffee, but it ain’t espresso. The coffee Geek writes:

There is a fifth type of machine often (mistakenly) called an espresso machine; these are the steam driven machines marketed by companies like Krups and Braun, usually found for under $100. Rather than producing authentic espresso, these machines produce a strong coffee, more akin to what a moka pot or Bialetti stovetop device brews. There’s nothing wrong with these types of machines; it’s just that, for the scope of this guide, we’re going to be pretty much ignoring them.]

Anyway, back to the hunt. Alex Abramovich of Slate was on a similar hunt a few years ago:

I should upgrade to a pump-driven espresso maker, which heats water in a sealed reservoir, then forces it through pre-ground espresso beans at a requisite 15 atmospheres of pressure. (Click here for a more detailed description of how these high-tech machines work.) These espresso makers are bigger, heavier, and more difficult to use than their steam-driven cousins. They’re also messier and a lot more expensive. But they’ll produce a dark, rich, foamy espresso, with the flavorful oils of a good coffee all on the surface. Once you’ve made a few shots, it’s hard to go back to anything else

[From Which espresso machine is best? – By Alex Abramovich – Slate Magazine]


“Bodum Chambord 12-Ounce Coffee Press” (Bodum)

I’m still on the look-out for my next machine. I don’t really want to spend over $300 dollars, and I have a fairly limited counter space to keep the thing, so I may settle for an also-ran machine that fulfills these parameters. Does seem to be more available than last time I researched the subject. Hmmm.

Any suggestions?


"Gaggia 14101 Classic Espresso Machine, Brushed Stainless Steel" (Gaggia)

2 replies on “Pump driven espresso”

I have a Melitta Cafe Cappuccino (which I got for $39 from Woot.com), that I can’t stand because it’s a pain to use.

I would buy a DeLonghi EC-155, which I’ve seen for around $80 at Target. The nice thing about it is that it’s self-priming. With mine I have to run water out of both the filter holder and steam wand before using it to get rid of air in the system. When mine dies (or maybe before) I plan to get the DeLonghi.

The nice thing about it is that it’s self-priming. With mine I have to run water out of both the filter holder and steam wand before using it to get rid of air in the system. When mine dies (or maybe before) I plan to get the DeLonghi.

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.