B12 Solipsism

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Nevada Democratic Caucus 2016

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Trains Has Moved
Trains Has Moved

If you’d noticed, there have been a lot of headlines about how Hillary Clinton has nearly won the nomination, and yet…

The final figures are in from the Nevada caucus, with the last unassigned delegate going to Hillary Clinton.

With the delegate–who came from the state’s fourth Congressional district–pledged to Clinton, the final Nevada tally sits at 20 delegates for Clinton and 15 for Bernie Sanders, according to figures released by campaign the Clinton campaign.

The Nevada results put the race’s overall delegate count thus far at for 52 Clinton and 51 for Sanders.

(click here to continue reading Final Nevada count: Clinton 20, Sanders 15 – POLITICO.)

That’s a pretty large lead, no? Especially since several of those delegates in Iowa were determined by coin flips…

The New York Times hasn’t updated their results page as of this writing, but the reported vote counts are pretty close, by my estimation.

Nevada Democratic Caucuas 2016 02 23 at 9 57 24 AM

Nevada Democratic Caucus 2016-02-23 at 9.57.24 AM 

The only real concern for the Bernie Sanders campaign should be the party hacks who have superdelegate status. 

But the often overlooked delegate count in the Democratic primary shows Mr. Sanders slipping significantly behind Hillary Clinton in the race for the nomination, and the odds of his overtaking her growing increasingly remote.

Mrs. Clinton has 502 delegates to Mr. Sanders’s 70; 2,383 are needed to win the nomination. These numbers include delegates won in state contests and superdelegates, who can support any candidate. She is likely to win a delegate jackpot from the overwhelmingly black and Hispanic areas in the Southern-dominated Super Tuesday primaries on March 1, when 11 states will vote and about 880 delegates will be awarded.

Mrs. Clinton already has a huge lead over Mr. Sanders in support from superdelegates — elected officials and party elders who each count toward the magic number of 2,383. But superdelegates could switch candidates if Mr. Sanders is the overwhelming choice of regular voters.

 

(click here to continue reading Delegate Count Leaving Bernie Sanders With Steep Climb – The New York Times.)

Superdelegates are a thumb on the scale of democracy, usually supporting the establishment’s candidates at the expense of insurgents. But, since there are no real enforceable rules about how superdelegates vote, the will of the people could, in theory, prevail. Whether party hacks will support a Democratic Socialist over a Clinton’s cash remains to be seen.

Written by Seth Anderson

February 23rd, 2016 at 10:14 am

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