B12 Solipsism

Spreading confusion over the internet since 1994

Twitter drops media and @name replies from 140-character limit

without comments

Tweet!
Tweet!    

Modestly useful change – there are certainly times when conversations are terse because of this.

A week after Bloomberg reported that Twitter was getting ready to relax its rules for what counts against your 140-character limit, the company is confirming the move today. Soon, photos and video won’t be included in that tally, freeing up more space for those witty quips. What’s more, usernames in replies won’t count against the limit either, and you’ll be able to retweet or quote your own posts. You know, just in case you need to remind everyone of that hot take you had a few months back.

When sending a tweet to someone you want all of your followers to see, you’ll no longer need to include a period or some other punctuation in front of their username. With the changes to the character limits, all tweets that begin with a Twitter handle will be seen by everyone who follows you by default. Despite the rumblings last week, regular ol’ links still count towards that 140-character allotment. CEO Jack Dorsey explained that these changes are the latest in an attempt to make the social network “simpler.”

(click here to continue reading Twitter drops media and @name replies from 140-character limit.)

Don’t know if it will “save” Twitter or not, but we’ll see.

Defunct Tweets
Defunct Tweets

I’m also glad Twitter didn’t go as far as first reported: that tweets could suddenly become novels…

The social media company will soon stop counting photos and links as part of its 140-character limit for messages, according to a person familiar with the matter. The change could happen in the next two weeks, said the person who asked not to be named because the decision isn’t yet public. Links currently take up 23 characters, even after Twitter automatically shortens them. The company declined to comment. It’s a step in a larger plan to give users more flexibility on the site. Chief Executive Officer Jack Dorsey said in January that the company was looking for new ways to display text on Twitter, and would experiment based on how people use the service. For example, some people tweet screenshots of longer text in articles, or send many tweets one after the other to tell a story. Twitter’s 140-character limit was originally adopted because it was a way to send Tweets while fitting all the information within a mobile text message — a common way for sending Tweets when the service debuted in 2006, before the proliferation of smartphones.

The company earlier this year considered raising the limit to as many as 10,000 characters. But the quick, concise nature of Tweets has helped set the site apart from the competition. Executives have spent the last few months emphasizing how Twitter is a destination for live events and discussion. Removing the character requirement for links and photos may encourage users to add more media to their posts.

(click here to continue reading Twitter to Stop Counting Photos and Links in 140-Character Limit – Bloomberg.)

I’m on Twitter often, if you are curious…

as is the feed for this sucky blog

Written by Seth Anderson

May 24th, 2016 at 10:02 am

Posted in News-esque

Tagged with ,

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