B12 Solipsism

Spreading confusion over the internet since 1994

Archive for the ‘sculpture’ tag

Iron Cock Head was uploaded to Flickr

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Rooster, whatever.

Toronto’s City Hall

embiggen by clicking
http://flic.kr/p/SAK4RE

I took Iron Cock Head on September 09, 2013 at 06:07AM

and processed it in my digital darkroom on March 10, 2017 at 05:28PM

Written by eggplant

March 10th, 2017 at 10:24 pm

Our Lady of Perpetual Decay was uploaded to Flickr

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Shrine, northside of Chicago somewhere (near Broadway, I think)

embiggen by clicking
http://flic.kr/p/H9MBFo

I took Our Lady of Perpetual Decay on June 08, 2013 at 12:57PM

and processed it in my digital darkroom on May 27, 2016 at 08:56AM

Written by eggplant

May 27th, 2016 at 12:17 pm

El Ray – Giant Olmec Head was uploaded to Flickr

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Teresa Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies, University of Texas, Austin

In November 2008, LLILAS celebrated the arrival of a special work of art on campus. The Universidad Veracruzana, one of Mexico’s most prominent universities, presented the institute with a colossal Olmec head, a replica of the iconic sculpture known as San Lorenzo Monument 1, or El Rey.

The original, now housed in the Museo de Antropología in Xalapa, Veracruz, is considered a signature piece of pre-Columbian Olmec culture and a world-class art object that represents New World civilization as emblematically as the Pyramid of the Sun at Teotihuacán or the ruins of Machu Picchu. One of seventeen colossal heads still in existence, San Lorenzo Monument 1 was found by noted archaeologist Matthew Stirling in the 1940s. His discoveries, and those of other archaeologists in Mexico during this time, unearthed for the world the culture of the Olmec, an ancient civilization that flourished in southern Mexico 1500-400 BCE and significantly influenced later cultures such as the Maya and Aztec.

The replica that now sits at the entry to LLILAS and the Benson Latin American Collection is made of solid stone and weighs 36,000 pounds. It was sculpted by Ignacio Pérez Solano, a Xalapa-based artist, who has spent his career exploring the history of the Gulf Coast and Mesoamerica. Pérez Solano meticulously reproduced San Lorenzo Monument 1 inch by inch, recreating the powerful lines and imposing features of the original work.

Pérez Solano began creating replicas of Olmec heads under the initiative of Miguel Alemán Velasco, who as governor of Veracruz from 1998 to 2004 endeavored to make Olmec culture better known beyond the borders of Mexico. Reproductions of other colossal heads can be found at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C., and the Field Museum in Chicago, among other locations. Miguel Alemán Velasco was present for the dedication ceremony at LLILAS on November 19, 2008, which also featured remarks by UT President William Powers and his counterpart, Raul Arias Lovillo of the Universidad Veracruzana. Fidel Herrera Beltrán, current Governor of Veracruz, also spoke, as did Olmec scholars from the U.S. and Mexico.
more
http://ift.tt/1WmBbw1

embiggen by clicking
http://flic.kr/p/FfbPs2

I took El Ray – Giant Olmec Head on July 20, 2014 at 08:41AM

and processed it in my digital darkroom on April 10, 2016 at 10:25PM

Written by eggplant

April 10th, 2016 at 9:40 pm

La Folie Des Grandeurs (Delusions of Grandeur) – René Magritte was uploaded to Flickr

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Getty Museum, LA.

I can relate.

more info:
http://ift.tt/1L3LI8B…

embiggen by clicking
http://flic.kr/p/ziGzM2

I took La Folie Des Grandeurs (Delusions of Grandeur) – René Magritte on February 02, 2013 at 05:19PM

and processed it in my digital darkroom on October 09, 2015 at 04:56AM

Written by eggplant

October 9th, 2015 at 8:40 am

One Chromosome Too Many was uploaded to Flickr

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Actual artist and title unknown.

On the corner of Barry and Broadway, Lakeview, Chicago.

Accidental over-exposure due to cameraman error (my Nikon dial often gets bumped when I walk for a while, but in this case, I liked the result)

embiggen by clicking
http://flic.kr/p/u2zD1r

I took One Chromosome Too Many on June 06, 2015 at 05:20PM

and processed it in my digital darkroom on June 08, 2015 at 02:04AM

Written by eggplant

June 7th, 2015 at 10:43 pm

One Chromosome Too Many was uploaded to Flickr

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Actual artist and title unknown.

On the corner of Barry and Broadway, Lakeview, Chicago.

Accidental over-exposure due to cameraman error (my Nikon dial often gets bumped when I walk for a while, but in this case, I liked the result)

embiggen by clicking
http://flic.kr/p/u2zD1r

I took One Chromosome Too Many on June 06, 2015 at 05:20PM

and processed it in my digital darkroom on June 08, 2015 at 02:04AM

Written by eggplant

June 7th, 2015 at 7:33 pm

Your Wicked Contrivance was uploaded to Flickr

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sculpture, Lincoln Park

embiggen by clicking
http://flic.kr/p/qcY5np

I took Your Wicked Contrivance on June 07, 2013 at 05:45PM

and processed it in my digital darkroom on December 21, 2014 at 08:17PM

Written by eggplant

December 21st, 2014 at 2:41 pm

Spooky was uploaded to Flickr

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Sculpture, West Loop

embiggen by clicking
http://flic.kr/p/oX4Hg8

I took Spooky on October 31, 2014 at 06:47PM

and processed it in my digital darkroom on November 01, 2014 at 04:01PM

Written by eggplant

November 1st, 2014 at 10:53 am

Sit Down And Be Counted was uploaded to Flickr

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Borders

A few of Steinunn Thorarinsdottir “Borders” sculptures in Grant Park.

“Borders” — hosted by the Chicago Park District in conjunction with the Grant Park Conservancy and the Icelandic Ministry of Culture, and sponsored by Bloomberg — will remain through spring, the sculptures looming with pupil-less gazes over park visitors. (Each aluminum piece weighs 180 pounds; each iron piece weighs 440 pounds.) Thorarinsdottir, who sometimes “stands and peeks” at passers-by, said she enjoys watching her art evoke different reactions from people.

And that’s the fundamental idea of this exhibition: Viewers make what they will of it. The pieces can be poked, stroked, cuddled — so long as the art stimulates some kind of mental and physical response, Thorarinsdottir said she considers her mission accomplished.

Her artwork, which took two years to complete, was first installed in 2011 at Dag Hammarskjold Plaza near the United Nations Headquarters in New York. Thorarinsdottir said she consciously placed her figures in that socially and politically charged environment, and her choice to install them in Chicago’s Solti Garden was just as careful and deliberate.

Days before “Borders” was installed, she sat on one of the garden’s benches for hours considering how her sculptures would fit into her surroundings. She recalled listening to the languages spoken by people of all sizes and colors, and she knew she had found her gallery space.

“I wanted the installation to relate to people that wherever we come from, whatever our life experiences, we’re all connected in shape and spirit,” she said. “This garden was my first choice, a natural choice.”

The park, situated just south of the Art Institute of Chicago, provides the intimacy of an enclosed room in an area heavy with foot traffic. The lattice of tree trunks forms the walls, brambly branches netting up into a leafy canopy.

“Some sites are too big, but this garden had a nice body. I like that it forms a natural ‘border’ that the viewer can cross and connect,” Thorarinsdottir said.

Thorarinsdottir purposely left her androgynous figures “neutral.” Some may be sitting, a couple kneeling, others standing, but their faces are left enigmatic. Her Icelandic background influenced her philosophy, she said: “In Iceland, it’s an island with lots of space, very few people, tons of organic nature. So everyone in Iceland gives this feeling that what you are, what you do, matters. We are individuals, but we are also all connected, we are all part of humanity.”

more: http://articles.chicagotribune.com/2013-08-07/entertainment/ct-ent-0808-borders-sculpture-20130808_1_art-institute-sculptures-exhibition…

embiggen by clicking
http://flic.kr/p/oAJasz

I took Sit Down And Be Counted on June 26, 2014 at 07:17PM

and processed it in my digital darkroom on August 05, 2014 at 02:38PM

Written by eggplant

August 5th, 2014 at 7:53 am

Dusk At Mary Bartelme Park was uploaded to Flickr

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West Loop

embiggen by clicking
http://flic.kr/p/nPeZag

I took Dusk At Mary Bartelme Park on May 31, 2014 at 09:39PM

and processed it in my digital darkroom on June 01, 2014 at 05:25PM

Written by eggplant

June 1st, 2014 at 10:35 am

Fanoenix by Debbie Mullins was uploaded to Flickr

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A bit of “found” art, rescued from beneath the ground.

Shot with my Hipstamatic for iPhone
Lens: Libatique 73
Film: Kodot XGrizzled
Flash: Off

embiggen by clicking
http://flic.kr/p/e3s4FE

I took Fanoenix by Debbie Mullins on March 15, 2013 at 12:07PM

and processed it in my digital darkroom on March 15, 2013 at 05:10PM

Written by eggplant

March 16th, 2014 at 12:06 pm

Scvlptvre – Global Marine House, Los Angeles was uploaded to Flickr

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815 W 7th St, Los Angeles, CA

Name: FINE ARTS BUILDING
Alternate Name: GLOBAL MARINE HOUSE


Artist, actual title unknown. If you know any history of this architectural detail, I’d love to hear it.

http://ift.tt/1iBXmeV

embiggen by clicking
http://flic.kr/p/dUtV9z

I took Scvlptvre – Global Marine House, Los Angeles on January 31, 2013 at 02:41PM

and processed it in my digital darkroom on February 13, 2013 at 03:28PM

Walter De Maria, Artist on Grand Scale, Dies at 77

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Walter De Maria's The 2000 Sculpture
Walter De Maria’s The 2000 Sculpture

For some reason, when I saw the above sculpture installation at LACMA, I didn’t remember that Walter De Maria was part of the NYC underground scene that also evolved into The Velvet Underground…

Walter De Maria, a reclusive American sculptor whose multifaceted achievement and sly Dadaist humor helped give rise to earthworks, Conceptual Art and Minimal art, on an often monumental scale, died on Thursday in Los Angeles. He was 77 and lived in New York.

In a career of more than 50 years Mr. De Maria made drawings of all-but-invisible landscapes, gamelike interactive wood sculptures and a record of himself accompanying the sound of crickets on the drums.

Mr. De Maria himself was a sometime percussionist who played in jazz and rock groups in New York in the 1960s, including one that evolved into Lou Reed’s Velvet Underground. Yet as an artist in later years he avoided the limelight, rarely giving interviews or letting himself be photographed.…

In other works Mr. De Maria favored shiny metals and pristine floor-hugging geometric forms that were often repeated in great numbers. 

From 1953 to 1959 he attended the University of California, Berkeley, studying history and painting, the latter under the painter David Park, who was also a musician and had a jazz group in which Mr. De Maria occasionally performed.

During these years Mr. De Maria was part of San Francisco’s developing avant-garde scene, participating in “Happenings” and theatrical performances and turning increasingly to three-dimensional works. His friends included the composer La Monte Young (later to become another Dia beneficiary) and the dancer Simone Forti, whose task-oriented choreography made him interested in interactive sculpture. Mr. De Maria moved to New York in 1960 and immersed himself in the downtown scene. He participated in Happenings with Robert Whitman (who was then married to Ms. Forti) and briefly ran a gallery on Great Jones Street with him, exhibiting Minimalist sculptures made of wood.

The sculptures were often Dadaist in intent. A piece called “Ball Drop” consisted of a tall columnar structure with a small hole at the top and bottom and a small wood ball. The viewer could drop the ball in the top hole and retrieve it from the bottom.

During this time Mr. De Maria performed with jazz musicians, including the trumpeter Don Cherry, and joined a band called the Primitives. It would evolve into the Velvet Underground.

(click here to continue reading Walter De Maria, Artist on Grand Scale, Dies at 77 – NYTimes.com.)

George Contemplating Walter De Maria's The 2000 Sculpture
George Contemplating Walter De Maria’s The 2000 Sculpture

Written by Seth Anderson

July 27th, 2013 at 10:23 am

Posted in Arts,Music

Tagged with , ,

Northerly Island sculptures

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Sculptor: Dessa Kirk. Sculpture apparently reclaimed Cadillac parts.
Northerly Island f/k/a Miegs Field

No Need To Hide It
No Need To Hide It

Cadillac Daphne - Northerly Island
Cadillac Daphne – Northerly Island

Late Afternoon - Northerly Isle
Late Afternoon – Northerly Isle

Written by Seth Anderson

November 29th, 2011 at 5:14 pm

Posted in Photography

Tagged with ,

Eye see u Willis

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Eye see u Willis
Eye see u Willis, originally uploaded by swanksalot.

(( The Sears Tower is n/k/a Willis Tower – but you knew that, right? ))

Eye (embiggening)
By Oak Park artist, Tony Tasset
Temporary Exhibit: From July to October, 2010.
Location: Pritzker Park, at the corner of State and Van Buren.
Insallation in progress of the 30-foot tall, giant eyeball made of fiberglass and steel, allegedly modeled on his own eye.

Shot with my Hipstamatic for iPhone
Lens: John S
Film: Pistil
Flash: Off

took a brief walk before lunch today to gaze at this three story eyeball as best as I could from behind the construction fences. Isn’t officially completed until July 7th, wonder what else remains to be done? Maybe just shoring up the base.

Anyway, very cool.

Written by swanksalot

June 30th, 2010 at 2:00 pm