B12 Solipsism

Spreading confusion over the internet since 1994

Archive for the ‘Chicago’ tag

Don’t Know Where To Finish was uploaded to Flickr

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Wolf Point somewhere

embiggen by clicking
https://flic.kr/p/2fLd1Xj

I took Don’t Know Where To Finish on August 31, 2014 at 04:51AM

and processed it in my digital darkroom on May 09, 2019 at 05:52AM

Update: apologies for multiple posts (IFTTT messed up again)

Written by eggplant

May 9th, 2019 at 5:58 am

Not Wasted A Single Penny was uploaded to Flickr

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Construction, West Loop

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https://flic.kr/p/2ftAALE

I took Not Wasted A Single Penny on March 21, 2016 at 04:16AM

and processed it in my digital darkroom on April 16, 2019 at 10:32AM

Written by eggplant

April 16th, 2019 at 12:02 pm

Did Not Draw A Conclusion One Way Or The Other was uploaded to Flickr

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Albany Park somewhere

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https://flic.kr/p/24Gj79T

I took Did Not Draw A Conclusion One Way Or The Other on May 03, 2015 at 11:04AM

and processed it in my digital darkroom on March 24, 2019 at 06:31PM

Written by eggplant

March 25th, 2019 at 1:32 am

You Wanted Some Privacy was uploaded to Flickr

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Alley, Loop.
(Fujifilm Neopan 1600 in emulation)

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https://flic.kr/p/T8yB91

I took You Wanted Some Privacy on February 22, 2015 at 05:09AM

and processed it in my digital darkroom on March 21, 2019 at 12:24PM

Written by eggplant

March 21st, 2019 at 12:08 pm

Poster Child For Corporate Welfare was uploaded to Flickr

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Boeing depends upon taxpayer dollars more than most corporations.

See for instance:
The top welfare recipient of them all is aerospace giant Boeing, which has operations spread all across the country building aircraft and working on numerous Department of Defense projects. The amount of work Boeing does for the federal government no doubt plays a part in the amount of subsidies the company has been able to secure, but Boeing has also played hardball with local jurisdictions to get enormous tax breaks. With more than $13 billion coming in from 148 handouts, Boeing has thoroughly entrenched itself in the interest of the government and taxpayers.

Despite the immense amount of money the company receives, it has still gone on to hold cities hostage in tax negotiations, threatening to remove jobs and open up shop in friendlier climates. In 2013, Boeing secured the highest ever tax break at the state level when it cornered the Washington legislature into ceding to its demands, lest it move its production plants to another part of the country. The legislature granted Boeing its wish, but Boeing went on to announce drastic layoffs anyway, angering many locals.

Boeing has become the king of corporate handouts, and other corporations have a long way to go to catch up.
via
www.cheatsheet.com/money-career/high-on-the-hog-the-top-8…

embiggen by clicking
https://flic.kr/p/T5QzU3

I took Poster Child For Corporate Welfare on March 02, 2018 at 05:07AM

and processed it in my digital darkroom on March 17, 2019 at 12:24PM

Written by eggplant

March 17th, 2019 at 1:08 pm

Door Nine was Explored

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Door Nine

Mural by Brazilian artist Cranio. Actual title unknown.

Hubbard Street Mural gallery.

I took this photo March 11th, 2019, and processed it in my digital darkroom the same day.

Explored, March 12, 2019.

Click to embiggen.

Written by Seth Anderson

March 14th, 2019 at 8:36 am

Posted in Photography

Tagged with , , ,

Michael Ferro Is A Horrid Human Being, Part the 454,239th

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The Perfect Way to Unwind

I always thought that Sam Zell was the worst owner the Chicago Tribune ever had, but Michael Ferro seems much worse.

NPR reports:

Several months after taking control of the troubled Tribune Publishing Co. in 2016, Chicago investor Michael Ferro convened a session of corporate leaders from within his own news empire, including chief news executives from such storied papers as the Los Angeles Times, the Chicago Tribune and The Baltimore Sun.

The group of about 20 people trooped from Chicago’s iconic Tribune Tower on Michigan Avenue to an upscale restaurant nearby. In a private room, participants dined on seafood and steak while Ferro, then the company’s chairman, held forth on his plans.

His own net worth was newly in the nine figures. Associates and peers say Ferro held ambitions that were wide-ranging, even audacious, given the newspaper industry’s stiff headwinds.

At the dinner, as at other moments, Ferro railed against those who he felt were impeding him — including perceived rivals and competitors. Among them: the Southern California billionaire and civic leader Eli Broad, whom Ferro called part of a “Jewish cabal” that ran Los Angeles.

(click here to continue reading Tribune, Tronc And Beyond: A Slur, A Secret Payout, And A Looming Sale : NPR.)

You Gave Without Taking

Yeah, and this:

Early this year, however, Tribune Publishing made the first in a series of secret payments to total more than $2.5 million to avert a threatened lawsuit filed by a fired newspaper executive, according to three people with knowledge of the deal. That had the effect of keeping Ferro’s anti-Semitic slur out of the public spotlight.

The company agreed to secretly pay Maharaj more than $2.5 million, in installments, according to three people with knowledge of the pact. That financial obligation was not disclosed in corporate filings to shareholders and analysts. The payments started in the first quarter of this year, for which Tribune Publishing reported a net loss of $14.8 million. The loss was attributed to the company’s decision in December 2017 to pay Ferro $15 million in consulting fees even as he served as chairman and was the company’s controlling owner.

Even as the company cut back jobs in traditional newsrooms, Levinsohn and other executives acted to create a separate staff apart from the LA Times and its other newspaper properties. He planned to draw upon outside writers, some uncompensated or who would even pay for the privilege of being associated with the newspapers’ brands. Plans included a consolidated entertainment website called LA.com and the outsourcing of Washington coverage to the digital news service Axios. Neither of those initiatives came to fruition. (LA.com still says “coming soon.”) But the digital strategy, gravitas with scale, sparked distrust among journalists.

The kicker is Michael Ferro still owns 25% of the Tribune, or what’s left of it as Ferro’s hand picked lackies furiously fire writers and jack up executive compensation to pull whatever profits they can off while the Tribune still exists.

Written by Seth Anderson

December 12th, 2018 at 6:17 pm

Sidewalks Sleek With Regrets and Recriminations was uploaded to Flickr

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River North,Chicago, light rain

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https://flic.kr/p/2c5Bt4t

I took Sidewalks Sleek With Regrets and Recriminations on November 04, 2018 at 06:30AM

and processed it in my digital darkroom on December 09, 2018 at 10:02PM

Written by eggplant

December 9th, 2018 at 10:12 pm

I’d Ask What The Matter Is But I Know You Don’t Talk Much was uploaded to Flickr

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Interstate Highway, Chicago

embiggen by clicking
https://flic.kr/p/2bUjEFF

I took I’d Ask What The Matter Is But I Know You Don’t Talk Much on March 16, 2015 at 07:54AM

and processed it in my digital darkroom on December 01, 2018 at 04:36PM

Written by eggplant

December 1st, 2018 at 6:12 pm

Sick Of All This Repetition was uploaded to Flickr

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Hubbard’s Cave, Interstate Highway underpass, Chicago

For reference for those who haven’t had the pleasure of experiencing it during rush hour traffic:
www.chicagoarchitecture.org/2009/09/23/what-is-hubbards-c…

embiggen by clicking
https://flic.kr/p/2ddoMRL

I took Sick Of All This Repetition on March 16, 2015 at 07:53AM

and processed it in my digital darkroom on December 01, 2018 at 03:49PM

Written by eggplant

December 1st, 2018 at 4:12 pm

Chicago Archdiocese pays $1.65 million for Lincoln Park home to be used as private residence

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A Mansion in Lincoln Park 

Chicago Tribune reports:

Chicago Archdiocese pays $1.65 million for Lincoln Park home to be used as parish priest residence. The Archdiocese of Chicago recently paid $1.65 million for a four-bedroom, 3,044-square-foot house on an upscale Lincoln Park street and is using the home as a residence for parish priests at the nearby St. Clement Catholic Church.

(click here to continue reading Chicago Archdiocese pays $1.65 million for Lincoln Park home to be used as parish priest residence – Chicago Tribune.)

As Jesus would have insisted: nothing but the most luxurious of accommodations. Mary and Joseph would have insisted on upgrading the countertops to marble and receiving an allowance to re-do the kitchen cabinets, but whatcha gonna do…

It isn’t as if there are cheaper places to be had in other areas of the city, right? Four priests, and their entourage, staying in a 3,000 square foot house is an efficient use of parish funds, right? Maybe they will devote a couple of the floors to house orphans and Honduran refugees or something.

Written by Seth Anderson

November 20th, 2018 at 10:37 pm

Posted in religion

Tagged with , ,

Where Chicago Trounces New York: Fixing Mass Transit

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Waiting For My Connection Back To You 

The New York Times:

Like New York’s subway, it is another century-old system struggling to keep up with the transit demands of a booming city. It, too, has been plagued by crumbling tracks, antiquated signals and unreliable trains that turn routine commutes into nightmares.

But the difference is that Chicago’s L has made a comeback, reversing decades of cost-cutting and neglect.

Today, nearly one-third of its tracks have been rebuilt for faster and smoother rides. Rail cars from the 1970s have been replaced with the latest models. More than three dozen stations have been overhauled, many rebuilt into sleek, steel-and-glass outposts. There are new elevators, wider platforms, high-definition security cameras and works by Chicago artists.

“We’ve had a pretty impressive turnaround,” said Joseph P. Schwieterman, a professor of public service at DePaul University. “It’s still an old system — and we still have delays — but the problems are staying out of the headlines and that’s quite an achievement.”

(click here to continue reading Where Chicago Trounces New York: Fixing Mass Transit – The New York Times.)

Government investing in infrastructure?! What a novel idea!

Chicago’s public transit is not the best in the world by a long shot, but it is certainly among the best in the US. Better than Austin, better than NYC, better than Dallas. Instead of tax cuts for billionaires, the federal government ought to invest in transportation infrastructure. I assume the impediment is Koch Brothers related, and that urban environments are more liberal than rural areas and thus the GOP mouth-breathers don’t want to divert funds from air craft carriers and the like.

Chicago is not Toronto, or London, UK, but it is possible to live in Chicago without having to own a car.

Written by Seth Anderson

October 18th, 2018 at 3:34 pm

Posted in government

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River City condo owners sue to block $90M sale to Marc Realty, say board conspired to ‘bribe’ holdouts, skew vote

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 River City and Van Buren Street Bridge

Cook County Record:

In the wake of a vote to approve a sale that would reportedly pave the way for the largest condos-to-apartments conversion in Chicago to date, a group of condominium owners in the River City complex have filed suit to block the more than $90 million sale, accusing the condo association board of working with the would-be buyers to essentially target and bribe certain unit owners to persuade them with secret “side deals” to vote to approve the sale.

The collection of condo owners, including owners on both sides of the vote to sell the South Loop condo complex to developer Marc Realty, filed their complaint in Cook County Circuit Court on Oct. 3 through attorneys with the firm of Chuhak & Tecson, of Chicago.…

According to the River City owners’ complaint, River City voters rejected two initial offers from Marc Realty for about $83.1 million and $92.2 million, respectively. In December 2017, unit owners appeared to approve a sale worth $100 million, with 79 percent of owners voting yes.

However, in May, Marc Realty terminated the sale, and then came back with an offer worth $90.5 million. About 77 percent of owners purportedly approved the sale at the lower purchase price in balloting that closed at the end of August.

However, opponents of the sale cried foul, and, according to the complaint, conducted an audit of the votes cast. They assert their audit indicates the purchase deal actually received only 72 percent of the vote.

Further, they alleged their information indicates the River City board worked with Marc Realty to hold the vote open, even though more than 90 percent of owners had voted, to allow the buyer to “bribe” as many as 35 owners with “additional consideration not set forth in the contract,” to change their votes from no to yes.

The complaint asserts this maneuver stands as a violation of the law, and should invalidate the vote, which they said “was the result of substantial misrepresentations .. to induce the owners to vote against their best interest.”

(click here to continue reading River City condo owners sue to block $90M sale to Marc Realty, say board conspired to ‘bribe’ holdouts, skew vote | Cook County Record.)

Wild. 

Unless this settles, I’d think this could drag out for years.

Written by Seth Anderson

October 4th, 2018 at 5:59 pm

Posted in Chicago-esque

Tagged with ,

I Mean It Sometimes – Explored on Flickr

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I Mean It Sometimes
I Mean It Sometimes

An iPhone snapshot that I mistakenly converted to DNG in Lightroom when importing, so I went ahead and processed it using the Photoshop workflow I usually use for photos taken with my Nikon – using the Photoshop Raw tools, DxO Software’s Color Efex 4, Alien Skin’s Exposure X3, and so on.

Turned out ok, though I’m not all that happy with the skies being as washed out as they are.

Flickr’s algorithm liked it apparently.

¯\_(ツ)_/¯

Written by Seth Anderson

August 31st, 2018 at 7:09 pm

Posted in Photography

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Unspoken Tensions

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Unspoken Tensions
Unspoken Tensions

Taken on May 16th, 2018, processed in my digital darkroom July 27th, 2018.

I flipped the image 180º to accentuate the angle, make the photo more dramatic. I also like how the cloud wisps turned into what looks like melted steel in the sky. 

Double click the image to embiggen.

Written by Seth Anderson

July 29th, 2018 at 10:59 am

Posted in Photography

Tagged with ,